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Toys and Games for Adults and Children

Page 3 - Adult / Adolescent Games

18th Century / 19th Century (1800s) / Victorian / Civil War


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Page Last Updated:
Sunday, 30-Oct-2016 15:28:28 EDT

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Children's Games & Toys

Balls and Ball Games
Balls and
Ball Games
Battledore and Shuttlecock
Battledore &
Shuttlecock
Bilbo Catcher
Bilbo Catcher
Wooden Building Blocks
Building Blocks
Wooden
Chalk Boards & Chalk
Chalk Boards
& Chalk
Cup and Ball
Cup and Ball
Penny Dolls and other Dolls
Dolls
Wooden Dominos in wooden box by Historical Folk Toys
Dominos
drop spindles by Historical Folk Toys
Drop Spindles
Americana Lithographed Toy Drum
Drums
Game of Graces
Game of Graces
Hopscotch by Historical Folk Toys
Hopscotch
Game of Jacks
Jacks (Game of )
Jacob's Ladder by Historical Folk Toys
Jacob's Ladder
Game of Knucklebones
Knucklebones
Knurr & Spell
Knurr & Spell
Marbles (Clay & Glass)
Marbles
(Clay & Glass)
Nine Men Morris
Nine Men Morris
Table Top NinePins
NinePins
(Table Top)
Pick-Up Sticks
Pick-Up Sticks
Quoits (ring toss game) by Historical Folk Toys
Quoits
(Ring Toss Game)
Rocking Horses
Rocking Horses
Rolling Hoop Toy
Rolling Hoop
School House Items
School House
(Items & Supplies)
Tops (Finger, Peg & Whip)
Tops
(Finger, Peg & Whip)
Whirli-Gigs (pewter and wood)
Whirli-Gigs
(Pewter & Wood)
Toy Wooden Guns
Toy Guns
(Wooden)
Yo-Yo (Bandelure and Prince of Wales Toy) by Historical Folk Toys
Yo-Yo
(Bandelure &
Prince of Wales Toy)
More Historical Children's Toys & Games Coming

Adult / Adolescent Games, including board games

Chess Set, 1795
Chess Set
1795
Dutch Renassance Dominos
Dominos
Checkers (Draughts)
Checkers
(Draughts)
Fox and Geese Solitaire game
Fox & Geese
Solitaire
Marble Board Games: Solitaire de Venezia
Marble Board
Games
Card Decks (playing cards)
Card Decks
Dice Games (pewter, wood and musketball
Dice Games
(Wood, Pewter &
Musketball)
More Coming

Chess Men, Chess Sets and Chess Boards

Item Last Updated: Sunday, 30-Oct-2016 15:28:28 EDT

Chess Set with storage box and board, copy of 1795 Calvert
    History: Chess is a Checkerboard game for two players, each of whom moves 16 pieces (known as Chessmen) according to fixed rules across the board and tries to capture or immobilize (checkmate) the opponent's king. Sir, though the now-standard rules of playing chess first became generally accepted in Europe in 16th century, but the game itself was originated in Asia long back about the 6th century. In India , the game is popularly known as ‘Shatranj'. The game was hobby and in some cases passion for the Kings and intellectuals of the Ancient India. The roots of this game are in India.

    Chess Set with Storage Box, copy of set by John Calvert, 1795 England: Mahogany box with drawers on both sides to hold the chess pieces. The storage case has a brown and tan chess board built into the top. There is a set of Red and a set of White chess pieces made of resin (imitation ivory, the pieces in the original set were carved ivory). Early games of chess made in ivory by master carvers and turners were often in red and white, or green and white combinations. This is a great parlor game (parlour game).

    This is an exact reproduction of a chess set made in 1795 by John Calvert in England. John Calvert was a Master of the Worshipful Company of Turners in London.

    Size: 38 cm x 38 cm x 10.8 cm, 15" x 15" x 4.25".

    Game of Chess: Same chess men as in the John Calvert chess set. Comes in glass top display case. No chess board included, but is available separately. Size: 38cm x 31.5cm x 8.5cm, 15" x 12.5" x 3.25"

    Chess Board: Chess Board. Chess Men not included. Size: 40 x 40 x 4.5cm, 15.75 x 15.75 x 1.75"

Chess Men, Boards and Sets
copy of 1795 Chess Set with Storage Box, original by John Calvert, England
Chess Set with Storage Box
copy of set by John Calvert
1795 England
Chess Game
Game of Chess
in Display Case
no board
Chess Board, Classic
Chess Board
Classic
no chessmen

Chess Men, Chess Sets and Chess Boards

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Chess Set with Storage Box  Discontinued
Game Of Chess: Pieces & Display Case  Discontinued
Chess Board: Classic Discontinued
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Domino Games

Item Last Updated: Sunday, 30-Oct-2016 15:28:28 EDT

Dutch Renaissance Domino Game
Wooden Dominos in wooden box
     Dutch Renaissance Domino Game: reproduction of a set crafted by a gifted Dutch renaissance artist over three centuries ago. Presented in a beautiful brass legged wood box. Rich in history, fun to play parlor game (parlour game). An unsurpassed gift for the discerning. Size: 23cm x 24cm x 5cm, 9" x 9.5" x 2".

    Wooden Dominoes Game: Our Wooden Dominoes set contains 28 double-six wooden dominoes, rules for play, and comes packaged in a wooden storage box with sliding lid. The storage box measures 6-3/4 inches by 1-1/2 inches by 2-1/4 inches. By Historical Folk Toys.

Domino Games

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Wooden Dominoes Set, in wooden box  @ $7.30 each
Dutch Renaissance Domino Game  @ $75.00 each
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     Historical Background: The Inuit game of "Á ma zú a lát" is similar to the game of dominoes. The Eskimo name for dominoes means "standing upright side by side." The European game of dominoes seems to have been borrowed from the Chinese, but only the math elements were retained.

     Dominoes have had shapes other than the flat, small pieces we now know. In Korea, dominoes were long, cube-shaped, bone-faced bamboo pieces. In India, "pase" dice-looking dominoes are long rectangular, cubed dice with pointed ends and are made of bone or ivory prisms, marked on four sides.

     Dominoes may have originally been used as counters in dice games or in a method of fortune telling with dice. In the year 1120 A.D., the dominoes we know today existed in China and it is believed that dominoes descended from dice around this time.

     The game of dominoes was a popular game during Colonial American times and continues to be a favorite American game. Dominoes are as popular with adults as they are with children. Many Irish pubs feature domino games and sponsor domino contests.


Draughts / Checkers

Item Last Updated: Sunday, 30-Oct-2016 15:28:28 EDT

Checker pieces, red and black painted wood
Wood Checker Pieces
Checker pieces, red and black painted wood with board
Wood Checker Board Set
    Draughts / Checkers: More commonly known today as checkers, this is an old game that was a favorite of George Washington. The game of Draughts was played exactly as we play Checkers today.

    Wood Checker Pieces: These checker pieces are painted wood. The set comes with 12 red and 12 black pieces. You can make your own board out of duck or other material to make a portable checker set for your haversack or valise. Or add a wooden checker board.

Draughts / Checkers

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Checker Pieces, Wood: 12 Red & 12 Black  @ $8.00 each
Checker Board Set, Wood (with 12 Red & 12 Black Checker Pieces) Currently Not Available
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Fox and Geese / Solitaire Game

Item Last Updated: Sunday, 30-Oct-2016 15:28:28 EDT

Fox and Geese / Solitaire
     Peg games such as Solitaire, Fox & Geese, and Nine Men's Morris were favorites in early American homes and taverns, and continued to be popular throughout the 19th century. Fox & Geese, a peg game in existence as early as the 14th century, was originally played on a 33 hole board; when Solitaire was popularized in the latter part of the 18th century (tradition has it that it was invented by a prisoner in the Bastille), the Fox & Geese game was transferred to the 37 hole Solitaire board.

     Game of Fox & Geese and Solitaire The number of geese pitted against the fox has fluctuated over the years but the rules have remained basically unchanged: the fox, represented by a single peg, has to prevent the geese, represented by all the other pegs, from surrounding him. In the Solitaire version, all pegs but one must be removed from the board, with the final move ending in a designated hole. Our game board is hand made of solid native hardwood. The set includes a full set of game pegs, as well as a history of the game and instructions. Packaged in a printed box.

Solitaire Games

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Fox and Geese Game / Solitaire @ $28.00 each
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Marble Board Games

Item Last Updated: Sunday, 30-Oct-2016 15:28:28 EDT

No Quarter, Marble Board Game
No Quarter

Solitaire Games (Parlor Game)

     To start the solitaire game, remove center (or any other) stone for playing. Play from outside to inside of the board. Goal is to end up with one single stone at the very center. No moving, only jumping (single and multiple) is allowed. Being solitaire, it's a game for a single player only.

     The Solitaire Game with Precious Stones has a hand turned, polished and waxed mahogany board. 38 marbles, including 2 spares. Every marble is hand cut from semi-precious quarried mineral. Each with its own distinctive colorings and markings, no two are alike. The size of the 20mm game is: 26.5cm x 4cm, 10.5" x 1.5"

     The Solitaire Di Venezia Game (also known as Solitaire De Venise or Venezianisches Solitär). Venetian solitaire game. Hand turned solid mahogany board come with 38 unique 25mm hand-blown marbles, including 2 spares. The marbles are in all colors, highly decorated, with no two marbles the same. Hand-blown marbles can be identified by the small hole in the glass, a tell-tale sign of the glass rod used by the glass blower to hold and turn the sphere in the kiln. The size of the game board is 30cm x 5cm, 12" x 2".

Chinese Checkers Game

     A wonderful 19th Century (1800s) board game that can be played with six players, each using 10 pieces.

Marble Board Games

20mm Solitare - Precious Stones, Marble Board Game
20mm,
Precious Stones
Solitaire Di Venezia, Marble Board Game
Solitaire di Venezia,
Glass Marbles

Marble Board Games

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20mm Solitaire Game, Precious Stones @ $100.00 each
25mm Solitaire Di Venzia Game @ $85.00each
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Playing Cards

Item Last Updated: Sunday, 30-Oct-2016 15:28:28 EDT

playing cards
I. Hardy Cards Package
playing cards
Early American
Playing Cards
illuminated playing cards
C. W. Illuminated
Playing Cards
1864 playing cards
1864 Highlanders
Poker Cards
L. I. Cohen
playing cards
American Cards
wooden poker chips
Wood Poker Chips
clay poker chips
Clay Poker Chips
Confederate Generals playing cards, 1863Confederate Generals playing cards, 1863
Confederate Generals
Playing Cards, 1863
Union Generals playing cards, 1862Union Generals playing cards, 1862
Union Generals
Playing Cards, 1863
Union and Confederate Military Leaders playing cards, 1862
Union & Confederate
Military Leaders
Native Americans playing cards, deck 1
Native American Cards, 1
Native Americans playing cards, deck 2
Native American Cards, 2
Buffalo Soldiers playing cardsBuffalo Soldiers playing cards
Buffalo Soldiers Cards
    I. Hardy Playing Cards, Period style paper wrapper secured with string. Authentic style cards with no numbers. I. Hardy, Maker. Rev War Design, Correct for Civil War usage.

    Early American Playing Cards, These are the same cards as the I. Hardy playing cards, except without the period style paper wrapper secured with string. Authentic style cards with no numbers. Rev War Design, Correct for Civil War usage by Historical Folk Toys.

    Illuminated Card Deck, This reproduction of a Civil War-era deck is beautifully crafted with gold detail embellishing every card.In the style of the times, this deck includes full-length, single-ended court figures, square corners and traditional non-indexed styling. Originally produced by L. I. Cohen, New York. Correct for the American Civil War period.

    1864 Poker Card Deck, Reproduction of a Civil War era poker deck with full-length, single-ended court figures. Box reproduced with original tax stamps showing hand cancellation June 2, 1864. Correct for the American Civil War period.

    American Playing Cards, Caleb Bartlett. Authentic style cards with no numbers. Very colorful deck. Pre-Civil War but will work nicely. The face cards are Kings are American Presidents, Jacks are Famous Indians, and Queens are Allegorical. Correct for the American Civil War period.

    Confederate Generals Playing Cards, Facsimile reproduction of playing cards originally published in 1863 by M. Nelson, New York. Each card face features an engraved portrait of a general or statesman of the Civil War Era. Each deck contains 54 cards.

    Union Generals Playing Cards, Facsimile reproduction of playing cards originally published in 1863 by M. Nelson, New York. Each card face features an engraved portrait of a general or statesman. Each deck contains 54 cards.

    Union & Confederate Military Leaders Playing Cards, Facsimile reproduction of playing cards originally published in 1863 by M. Nelson, New York. This double deck set (54 cards per deck) features an engraved portrait of a different general or statesman on each card. Contains Union and Confederate Generals Playing Card Decks.

    Native American Card Decks, Not a reproduction decks, but very interesting. Each deck contains a collection of 55 cards with full color portraits of Native Americans painted during the early 19th century. Two sets are available.

    Buffalo Soldiers Card Deck, Not a reproduction decks, but very interesting. The black regiments, which came into being in 1866, quickly earned the respect of both fellow servicemen and opponents. This beautifully illustrated deck of 54 cards pays homage to those leaders whose contributions helped change the face of American. 1866-present including Colin Powell.

Playing Cards

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Reproduction Playing Cards

I. Hardy Cards, Rev War Plus Discontinued
Early American Playing Cards, Rev War Plus  @ $8.60/deck
1864 Poker Cards (Highlanders), Civil War Plus @ $12.00/deck
Illuminated Playing Cards, Civil War Plus @ $28.00/deck
Confederate Generals Playing Cards - 1863, Civil War Plus @ $12.00/deck
Union Generals Playing Cards - 1863, Civil War Plus @ $12.00/deck
Union & Confederate Military Leaders Playing Cards - 1863, Civil War Plus @ $24.00/deck

Historical Interest Playing Cards, NOT Reproduction

Native American Playing Cards, Set 1 @ $14.00/deck
Native American Playing Cards, Set 2 @ $14.00/deck
Buffalo Soldiers Playing Cards @ $10.00/deck
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    Historical Background: Playing cards were invented during the 12th century in China. These early cards were probably paper dominoes since the official Chinese record for the invention of paper was 105 A.D. Sir William Henry Wilkinson, a British sinologist, published an article entitled "Chinese Origin of European Playing Cards" in the American Anthropologist in 1895. This historic paper compares Chinese and European decks of playing cards and includes a wealth of information. From China, playing cards may have spread to Venice, Italy, via Marco Polo or his father.

    From Venice, cards made their way to other European countries. There are many mentions of cards from Ulm, Germany, in the late 1300s and early 1400s. Even though no actual card packs exist from this time, it is certain that woodcuts would have been used in their production by this time. The invention of the removeable-type printing press made mass production of playing cards possible around 1440.

    Playing cards also became very popular for gambling. Preachers denounced card playing and the conduct that followed "poor losers" who exhibited bad behavior and emotional outbursts. It was declared immoral and prohibitions sprang up in many cities. Ulm, Germany, had a prohibition against card playing in 1397. Other prohibitions and ordinances against card playing occurred in Paris, France, in 1377; St. Gallen, Switzerland, in 1379; Lille, France, in 1382; Barcelona, Spain, in 1382; and, again, in Paris, France, in 1397 forbidding working people to play cards on working days.

    Some card decks from China featured only three "suits." The four suits used in present-day playing cards (spades, hearts, diamonds & clubs) are derived from the Middle Ages where the Tarot deck reflected the societies of Medieval times. The king ruled a world in which there were four classes: the church, military, merchants, and farmers. These four classes were featured as suits on the cards in the forms of cups (the church), swords (military), pentacles or five-pointed stars (merchants), and batons (farmers). When card popularity spread throughout Europe and, particularly, into Germany during the 15th century, the cups became hearts, the swords became spades, the pentacles became diamonds, and the batons became clubs.

    English playing cards from the 15th century probably evolved from France. The first documentation of cards in England is from an Act of Parliament (3 Edw. IV.c.4) in which domestic card makers petitioned against the importing of foreign cards. At this point, cards had plain backs, square corners, no numbers in the corners, and the face cards were single ended.

    It is thought that Christopher Columbus' expedition brought playing cards to what is now Latin America. Cards were later brought to the New World by Jamestown settlers. In the American colonies, Puritan children were not allowed to play cards and the sale of cards was prohibited in their communities. In the Puritan Colony Laws of 1656, children and servants were to be "publickly whipt" for second offenses of playing cards. The county records of Plymouth, Massachusetts, show that in 1633 two heathens were fined two pounds each for card playing. The colonists did, however, enjoy playing cards. When Captain James Cook returned from England to Jamestown, Virginia, he found the colonists starving, but still playing with cards!

    Card designs featuring the King, Queen, Jack, and the "pip" cards (cards without numbers from two to ten) did not change much from the 15th to 19th centuries. During the mid-19th century, face cards became double-headed and the card values appeared in the left corners to allow greater ease in reading fanned cards. Players would also not want their opponents to know whether they had a face card by turning these cards right side up. Doubled-headed face cards helped players "protect the hands" or not "tip their hand" to another player.

    Up until 1850, most playing cards had plain backs. Because this plain side could become soiled or "marked" and used for cheating, design patterns began to appear on the backs of cards. In some American cities further inland, this type of card deck with plain backs was used longer than 1850 simply because it took a while for the other cards to migrate to western states and territories. After cards were played with a number of times, the square corners rubbed off and, so, rounded corners became the new standard. After all, cards were made from only heavy paper then and did not have the plastic-coated finish we see on today's cards. Playing Cards are the basis for some parlor games (parlour games)

    Native Americans also made their own cards, but not out of paper. They used animal hides and decorated each card individually. A set of North American Indian cards is displayed in the National Museum in Washington, D.C.

    Fun Fact: The joker was invented because of a game called Eucher, which needed one more high card. Card manufacturers would add a blank card called the "Eucher card" in each deck. The word was mispronounced and the "joker" was born!


Dice and Dice Games

Item Last Updated: Sunday, 30-Oct-2016 15:28:28 EDT

Pewter Dice
     Although the earliest games of chance were played with dice that gave simple heads or tails results, dice with dots are as old as ancient Egypt and dice as we know them today were used in backgammon, probably the oldest game in recorded history.

    Dicing games such as Hazard were 18th century tavern favorites in the North American colonies and the forerunner of today's most popular casino dice games. Although gambling may have met with disapproval from many proper colonists, dice were nonetheless a common household item as many board games called for a pair of dice for play.

    Dice in various shapes and designs, made in materials both precious and common were found throughout the ancient world. In early America dice made of wood, bone or ivory would have been common.

    Wooden Dice: by Historical Folk Toys.

    Pewter Dice: While idle in the battlefield 18th century militiamen would take lead musket balls and hammer them into dice to while away the time at camp. We have packaged 3 of our lead free pewter dice, cast to closely resemble those imperfect handmade dice. Come in poly bag along with a history of dice and instructions for play.

    Crown and Anchor: a dice gambling game dating back to the early 18th century. It was popular in the British Navy and also played, though less popular, with Australian and American sailors as well as other servicemen. The game uses three 6 sided dice and a board. Each of the dice have a different symbol on each of the six sides: a crown, an anchor, a spade, a heart, a diamond, and a club. The board / layout, often made of wood or cloth, also contains one each of these same symbols. The player places bets on one or more of the six symbols. The player then rolls the dice and is paid based on the number of symbols showing on the rolled dice corresponding to the symbols the player bet on. Payout is 1:1 for a matching symbol on the dice , 2:1 on a two and 3:1 on a three. The odds are in favor of the banker by around 7.5%. This game eventually evolved into the casino game of "Chuck a Luck".
Information about Crown and Anchor dice game from Encyclopedia Britannica. Currently NOT Available, we are looking for a good source for the dice AND board.

Dice and Dice Games

pewter dice
Pewter Dice
wooden dice
Wooden Dice

Dice and Dice Games

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Pewter Dice (Package of 3) @ $6.50 each
Wooden Dice (Package of 3) @ $4.80 each
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     Historical Background: Playing with dice dates back to ancient Greece and Rome. Dice are commonly associated with gambling but there are many other games that can be played for fun. Names for the forerunners of dice games were Astragali and Knucklebones. A game of this type is depicted in a 3rd-century B.C. Roman sculpture featuring two girls close to the ground, one of them in the position to roll. Astragali are the knucklebones of a goat. Other knucklebones are the dried ankle bones of sheep and have four different sides, flat, concave, convex, and one sinuous or curvy side. The name "k'ab" is the Arabic word for "knucklebone" and "die." The game of jacks is also known as "knucklebones" because sheep bones were used to play a game which was the forerunner of jacks.

     When playing dice-like games, values were given to each side of the knucklebones. The bones were tossed into the air and a player tried to have them land on the back of the hand or on the ground. Points were determined and scores kept. Eventually, six-sided cubed dice replaced the bones. A cube-shaped dotted die dated 600 B.C. from the Greek colony of Naucratis, Egypt, was discovered by Flinders Petrie.

     Colonial American children played with dice and wealthy families would have had ivory dice, while the "common folk" would have used wooden dice. Dice have been made of bone, antler, ivory, horn, wood and, later during the American Revolutionary War, soldiers made dice out of lead bullets and played dice games to pass the time.

     Dominoes are closely associated with dice. Domino spots look like two dice placed side by side. Dominoes, along with dice, may have been used in fortune telling as long ago as 1120 A.D.

     As with playing cards, dice had gambling issues that caused prohibitions and ordinances to be passed. In 1364 in St. Gallen Switzerland, an ordinance forbade dice games, allowed board games, but did not mention playing cards. In 1382 in Lille, France, an ordinance forbade various games, including dice and "quartes" (an early word for cards). In the same year in Barcelona, Spain, an ordinance prohibited dice and cards in just one home of a certain town official. Fifteen years later in Paris, France, a decree was issued forbidding working people to play dice and other gambling-type games on working days.

     Many dice games made use of a cup to shake the dice in, rather than in a hand. It seems that this method kept some players from "palming" loaded dice. Loaded dice are dice that have been tampered with to cause a predictable outcome. The "shaker cup" supposedly made dice playing a fair game. The dice could, however, still be "loaded" by a skilled cheat.


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Welcome to the
Leavey Foundation for Historic Preservation, Inc.
Web Site: USHist.com
d.b.a.: AzRA Re-Enactors Association / AZRA
Contact Information

    Our forte is the 19th Century (1800s) United States History covering the period 1820-1920. Including: Victorian, Edwardian, Mexican War, American Civil War (Confederate / CS / CSA and Union / US / USA), Indian Wars, Old West & Spanish-American (Span-Am) War. We are involved in both historic preservation and education.

    We hope teachers, students, historians & researchers will find these pages useful, as well as reenactors & production companies.